Christy Henrichs-Beck

Title: Senior Staff Psychologist

Additional Roles: Gender Support Specialists Team Co-Coordinator

Alma Mater: University of Tennessee, Knoxville (2017)

Professional Interests: I love my job and the opportunity to support students’ growth and healing. As a therapist, I enjoy working with all students and presenting concerns, though I have particular interests in working with sexuality/affectional orientation, gender, LGBTQIA+ individuals, trauma recovery, family of origin issues, relational concerns, and group therapy. I am passionate about social justice advocacy and supporting students in understanding and navigating their multiple, intersecting social identities. My therapeutic approach is an integration of relational-cultural therapy and Gestalt therapy empathizing interpersonal process, intersectionality theory, and experiential interventions. Lastly, one of my favorite aspects of working at a university counseling center is having the opportunity to supervise and support clinicians in training.

Personal Interests: Outside of work, I spend most of my time adventuring outdoors with my puppy son, Emerson. I also enjoy spending time with friends, reading all the sci-fi and fantasy books I can get my hands on, exploring on my bicycle, and experimenting in the kitchen.

UO Love: All the natural treasures here—trees, ocean, mountains.

Professional Interests

I have one of the best jobs on the planet. The opportunity to sit with another human being, and bear witness to their deepest experiences of suffering and healing is a true honor and profoundly meaningful to me. As a therapist, I enjoy working with all students and presenting concerns, though I have particular interests in working with sexuality/affectional orientation, gender, LGBTQIA+ individuals, trauma recovery, family of origin issues (especially ACOA), relational concerns, and group therapy. I am passionate about social justice advocacy and supporting students in understanding and navigating their multiple, intersecting social identities. Lastly, one of my favorite aspects of working at a university counseling center is having the opportunity to supervise and support clinicians in training.

Theoretical Orientation and Therapy Approach

As is true for many clinicians, my therapeutic approach is largely based on my ever-evolving understanding of what it means to be alive and human. I currently practice using an integration of relational-cultural therapy and Gestalt therapy, emphasizing interpersonal process, intersectionality theory, and experiential interventions. I seek to bring my interest and presence to the therapy space with particular attention to the Gestalt pillars of field theory (context), phenomenology (the client’s meaning making processes), and dialogue (the meeting of myself and the client in contact). I believe that the mechanisms for healing and change are innately within each human being, and that therapy is very much a process of coming home to one’s true and full self. For me, this process is about increasing awareness of internal and external interruptions to need-resolution cycles and coming to accept and understand how we truly feel and are.  Additionally, I infuse aspects of Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP), Internal Family Systems (IFS), and Sensorimotor Psychotherapy when relevant and supportive. In understanding psychotherapy to be a craft and an art, I seek to continue developing as a practitioner by training with various Gestalt therapist communities throughout the year.

Supervision Approach and Model

The opportunity to support the development and growth of clinicians in training is one of my favorite and most satisfying roles as a psychologist. I can easily recall the many profound and formative experiences in supervision that helped me become the practitioner I wanted to be, and I strive to provide this same space and support for others. To date, I have had the honor of providing supervision to trainees of a variety of developmental levels and focus areas (e.g., primary, trauma recovery, gender support services, group). My approach to supervision is a mixture of relational, Gestalt, and multicultural approaches rooted in a developmental framework. I seek to cultivate a growth-fostering relational space in which trainees can focus on integration of personal and professional selves, use-of-self as a therapeutic instrument; and developing and refining case conceptualizations and therapy approaches that align with themselves as people and their worldviews. I value transparency, reciprocal learning, and working at the edges of our growth areas. My greatest interest is in providing a balance of support and challenge focused on building awareness of the “what’s,” “how’s,” and “why’s” within a trainee’s work. From this awareness greater flexibility and choice emerges, allowing trainees to expand and refine the ways they show up and interact with clients in the service of healing and change. If this type of space and supervision style piques your interest, I would be happy to talk further about what working together could look like.